Recognition

Blue eyes  scan my face as I open the door
Familiarity fills them,
She’s seen me before
At her chair by the window, I sit by her side
Leaning forward in whisper,
She starts to confide

“Do I know you?” she asks, and my heart races on
“Yes, Mom, it’s me—”
“I remember, my son.”

I give her the flowers that I bring every week,
Her favourite, I tell her
The lilies so sweet.

We talk and she asks how I’ve been since last time,
I smile and I lie to her,
“Everything’s fine.”

She calls up lost memories of Benji and Claire,
My son’s laughing smile,
My wife’s plaited hair.

I tell her they’re well, that they’re happy, like me,
She doesn’t remember
The car; the tree.

At the end of my visit, I kiss her lined cheek
“I’ll see you again, Mom,
the same time next week.”

As I leave the nurse tell me that it’s been a good day,
I nod, time will tell
If the memory stays.

.


Written for the WordPress daily prompt, Recognize. Image source is here.

8 Comments on “Recognition

  1. That is a beautiful poem. I have Alzhemiers myself and memories are a bit hit and miss sometimes, but life carries on 🙂

    Like

    • I’m sorry to hear that, Tracey, and I hope you and your loved ones are still able to share good times together. I’m glad the poem resonated with you, and here’s hoping that memory loss isn’t a dark area in medicine forever!

      Like

      • Well i do my best. I live alone but friends and family keep an eye. I go out and give talks to the general public, do as much as I can to remain as independent as possible 🙂 which is so important to me

        Like

          • It took me nearly two years to try and get someone to believe that there was something wrong with me. I am 46 now. Unfortunately in the UK some doctors still don’t believe that dementia affects all ages not just the elderly. That is why I go out as well to give them proof. No one should have to go through the fight I had. I hate the stigma surrounding dementia and mental health in general. People can talk about Cancer but shhh mustn’t talk about dementia. I get that often 🙂

            Like

  2. Dementia scourge of our times affects us all because its a numbers game, nobody knows who is next. Excellent picture and great poem, keep up the good work!

    Like

Leave a Reply to The Urban Spaceman Cancel reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: